USED TIME MACHINE FOR SALE • by Kelsey Snyder

Planetary Exchange > > > Classifieds > > > Pittsburgh > > > Transportation by Owner > > > Other Vehicles

Seller > > > Riley Jackson

Used Time Machine for Sale. Fully functional. Otterheim model 3188.

Used only once, four years ago. If necessary, the ETTA (Earth Temporal Travel Administration) can provide proof that its last traveler arrived at her designated time period.

The time machine is the third Otterheim model (yes, the “round” one), with a shell made of titanium and aluminum. It is powered by a plutonium ion battery. The diameter is 6 feet, and it weighs approximately one ton.

The Otterheim is capable of traveling up to 2,000 years into the past. As with all time machines, traveling into the future is not possible. Please see the included holovid for more information.

I should mention that the time machine fits only one passenger. To explain for those unfamiliar with time travel, the machine remains in the current time while only your body travels into the past. If multiple users will be traveling, you will need to use the machine individually.

Please be aware, however, that there is a recharge time: one day for each year the time machine can travel back. To give an example: if you were to follow someone who went back 1,500 years, you would need to wait 1,500 days for the machine to recharge.

If choosing to follow someone, please consider this carefully. A lot could happen in four years. You could start a new job. Survive a life-threatening disease. Lose your brother (and the only family member you have left.) You could even fall in love with someone else and be forced to choose between the past and the future.

But, I digress.

Planetary law requires me to post the legal requirements of time travel. I will try my best to not bore you with the details.

(1)       Note that running into yourself in the past breaks the Statute of Temporal Travel as voted on by the Earth Supreme Court in Neeson vs. ETTA. Therefore, you may not travel anytime less than 100 years before you were born. Specific details are available on the ETTA holosite. Some time periods are off limits completely, including (but not limited to) 1492, 1933-1945 and 1969.

(2)       Please remember that a location in 3192 will not be the same location in 1692. You wouldn’t want to appear in the middle of the Salem witch trials. Plan accordingly.

(3)       Due to the physics of time travel, you will not be able to take anything with you. No money, no pictures, no heirlooms. No clothing. I suggest choosing a remote location.

(4)       As with any machine that tears apart and reassembles your molecules, there is a slight chance of death, but I assure you that this is one of the safest models out there. Scientists have estimated that death occurs in only 6 out of every 100 trips. If you’ve read this far, you probably think the risk is worth it. My wife certainly did.

But, I digress again.

(5)       To legally time travel, please be aware that you must apply for a Certificate of Temporal Relocation (CTR), which is available from the ETTA. For all intents and purposes, you will be considered dead in the current time. Without this certificate, your loved ones will not be able to inherit your assets. From experience I can tell you that this is quite a hassle, so please take the time to fill out the CTR.

If you need any further details, I suggest holochatting with the Otterheim support team, as they are quite helpful. Feel free to mention my name. They know me quite well. Perhaps too well. (On second thought, you might not want to mention my name.)

You may think it strange that I saved the price for last, but I wanted you to read the details first. These models sell for upwards of a million planetary dollars, but I have no need of such money.

I am giving the time machine away for free. Yes, for free.

The Otterheim can be found in the shuttle dock of 241 Sycamore in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. I can’t guarantee what you’ll find. The time machine may be gone by the time you arrive. You could find it intact but with no charge.

Removing it from the premises is your responsibility. The logistics do not concern me.

However it does occur to me that, as I finish writing this, I have spoken in error. I said that the time machine had only been used once, but that is now inaccurate.

By the time you read this, the Otterheim will have been used twice.


Kelsey Snyder is a market researcher who recently landed in Michigan (although unfortunately not in a time machine). In her free time, she writes speculative fiction short stories and organizes a wonderfully eclectic meetup.


If you want to keep EDF around, Patreon is the answer.

Rate this story:
 average 2.8 stars • 19 reader(s) rated this

Every Day Fiction

  • Samantha

    It pretty much sounds like an instructions manual rather than a story to me.

  • Samantha

    It pretty much sounds like an instruction manual rather than a story to me.

  • I love the idea of the story hidden in the advertisement and I think the rules for the use of time machine, particularly the part about the recharge were very original (that’s hard to accomplish in this well-trod story-territory). However, the hints behind the ad were too few and I didn’t feel like the ending was earned. Why did the main character change his/her mind?

    • Kathy

      Structuring the story as an ad, or a manual or a message to a potential buyer, is a creative device many writers have used successfully to tell a story, but it needs to be one or the other and stay consistent with the form chosen. With this story, the ad choice would work because it adds to the story, but there are some problems in how it has been done. It is too long, too wordy and too personal for a typical ad or “Free To Taker” notice. If the story presented the MC as composing the ad and the comments were his thoughts as he wrote and edited it, it might have worked better. As it is, it doesn’t stay within the limits of the chosen structure. A more basic problem for me: travel with this machine is one-way, so once he uses it, he will not be returning, so why does he care what happens to it afterwards? Why would he bother to write the ad? I liked where this was going, but I got lost along the way. I had no clear understanding of why his wife left or why he wanted to follow her. If I calculated this correctly, his wife travelled to a time four years earlier from when she used the machine requiring a four-year recharge before anyone else could use it again. It is unclear if he intends to return to the time eight years earlier, her target time, or four years earlier, when she left. Does he plan to prevent her leaving or…what?

      • S Conroy

        I actually understood it as the wife travelling back 1500 years. One day recharge for each year which meant he had to wait 1500 days or 4 years and a bit before he could reuse the machine and follow her.
        Eitherways agree that it would be good to know her motivation.

        • Kathy

          Of course, I see you’re right – one day per year, not one year per year! Her leaving makes even less sense to me now – why DID she go?

          • S Conroy

            With any luck the author will drop by and put us out of our misery. 🙂

        • MPmcgurty

          Thanks for doing the math for me. 🙂 I’m tired.

          • S Conroy

            Welcome. Einstein at your service. 🙂

      • MPmcgurty

        It’s against the law to return to any time within 100 years, ’cause you might run into yourself.

        • Kathy

          Another oversight on my part, thanks!
          A question for those more familiar with time travelling in fiction: if you travel back in time, is it to the period as it was, or as it might have been changed by other time travelers – such as the MC’s wife? If not the latter, how would he find his wife?

          • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

            For a fine story dealing with the potential fallout from disrupting the past, see Asimov’s “The Ugly Little Boy.” A little dated in the treatment of spinster-ladies but the sci-fi aspects are great.

          • Michael Ampersant

            Well, Einstein-wise you can’t travel back in time, but you can travel forward in a circuitous sense, by moving around at very high speeds.

  • I love the idea of the story hidden in the advertisement and I think the rules for the use of time machine, particularly the part about the recharge were very original (that’s hard to accomplish in this well-trod story-territory). However, the hints behind the ad were too few and I didn’t feel like the ending was earned. Why did the main character change his/her mind?

    • Kathy

      Structuring the story as an ad, or a manual or a message to a potential buyer, is a creative device many writers have used successfully to tell a story, but it needs to be one or the other and stay consistent with the form chosen. With this story, the ad choice would work because it adds to the story, but there are some problems in how it has been done. It is too long, too wordy and too personal for a typical ad or “Free To Taker” notice. If the story presented the MC as composing the ad and the comments were his thoughts as he wrote and edited it, it might have worked better. As it is, it doesn’t stay within the limits of the chosen structure. A more basic problem for me: travel with this machine is one-way, so once he uses it, he will not be returning, so why does he care what happens to it afterwards? Why would he bother to write the ad? I liked where this was going, but I got lost along the way. I had no clear understanding of why his wife left or why he wanted to follow her. If I calculated this correctly, his wife travelled to a time four years earlier from when she used the machine requiring a four-year recharge before anyone else could use it again. It is unclear if he intends to return to the time eight years earlier, her target time, or four years earlier, when she left. Does he plan to prevent her leaving or…what?

      • S Conroy

        I actually understood it as the wife travelling back 1500 years. One day recharge for each year which meant he had to wait 1500 days or 4 years and a bit before he could reuse the machine and follow her.
        Eitherways agree that it would be good to know her motivation.

        • Kathy

          Of course, I see you’re right – one day per year, not one year per year! Her leaving makes even less sense to me now – why DID she go?

          • S Conroy

            With any luck the author will drop by and put us out of our misery. 🙂

        • MPmcgurty

          Thanks for doing the math for me. 🙂 I’m tired.

          • S Conroy

            Welcome. Einstein at your service. 🙂

      • MPmcgurty

        It’s against the law to return to any time within 100 years, ’cause you might run into yourself.

        • Kathy

          Another oversight on my part, thanks!
          A question for those more familiar with time travelling in fiction: if you travel back in time, is it to the period as it was, or as it might have been changed by other time travelers – such as the MC’s wife? If not the latter, how would he find his wife?

          • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

            For a fine story dealing with the potential fallout from disrupting the past, see Asimov’s “The Ugly Little Boy.” A little dated in the treatment of spinster-ladies but the sci-fi aspects are great.

          • Michael Ampersant

            Well, Einstein-wise you can’t travel back in time, but you can travel forward in a circuitous sense, by moving around at very high speeds.

  • I enjoyed the story within the ad, though it was a slow start. I didn’t think the character changed his (mentioned his wife) mind about giving it away, I think he planned on using it one last time and never coming back.

    Maybe he’s going to search for her? That’s why he’s pestering the Otterheim company and it would be best not to mention his name? And I loved the humour (plan accordingly).

    Four stars…would have been five but for the slow start.

  • I enjoyed the story within the ad, though it was a slow start. I didn’t think the character changed his (mentioned his wife) mind about giving it away, I think he planned on using it one last time and never coming back.

    Maybe he’s going to search for her? That’s why he’s pestering the Otterheim company and it would be best not to mention his name? And I loved the humour (plan accordingly).

    Four stars…would have been five but for the slow start.

  • Paul A. Freeman

    Could have been funnier, could have had more of a story line, could have done with a further edit (some modals out of whack here and there) – just get in the Otterheim, go back in time and re-work it.

    • joanna b.

      great comment,

      Paul. please, get me an Otterheim.

    • Michael Ampersant

      Could, could…it’s one of the best stories I read on EDF (I’m not going to elaborate, vise today’s advice to commentators).

  • Paul A. Freeman

    Could have been funnier, could have had more of a story line, could have done with a further edit (some modals out of whack here and there) – just get in the Otterheim, go back in time and re-work it.

    • joanna b.

      great comment,

      Paul. please, get me an Otterheim.

    • Michael Ampersant

      Could, could…it’s one of the best stories I read on EDF (I’m not going to elaborate, vise today’s advice to commentators).

  • Maybe tomorrow. Maybe. sigh

  • S Conroy

    Found this interesting to read and I like the humour in it. I’d have liked a few more clues on the ending though, perhaps a bit more on his wife’s motivation for using the machine. — Originally I thought she went back in time to get away from him, even at the risk of death. But then it seems that he uses it again and it’s probably to find his wife. So the “a lot could happen in 4 years” paragraph is actually a reference to his situation (?).

    Can anyone tell me what was so awful about 1969? Couldn’t be the moon landings…

    • Samantha

      Or even Nixon’s “landing”….

      • S Conroy

        Wrote something too long and deleted.
        Anyway Nixon feels a bit trivial compared to WW II.
        Realised now that 1492 is ambiguous too. Columbas? Not good if you’re an American Indian. Or could be expulsion of the Jews in Europe.

        • Samantha

          I was only kidding…What about WWI? And why ’33-45 only? Yeah, I know that 1492 has far too many interpretations….The Scots, The English, the Moorish, The Spanish and many others…

          • 33-45 FDR’s reign

          • 1969 – also year I got married 🙂

          • Samantha

            Im sure then its a great year!…Hang on…you sound like a ’60s baby in the very good sense!

          • Samantha

            Thanks a lot for that Jeff! I could not understand it! I thought it may have implied the Great Depression but ’29-’32 was left out!

          • 1969 Moon Landing

          • Samantha

            mmmm…. that’s what we thought but I cant understand the bad thing about that….:)

          • Samantha

            And Manson was “busy”….

          • So was Joan Didion

          • Samantha

            HAHAHA!!! But was not put behind bars for her white album….

          • Some escaped fame. Some did not.

        • Samantha

          not for the Vietnam veterans….

          • Paul A. Freeman

            It seems fairly clear that the author chose historical landmark dates that were readily recognisible, no matter where you are from geographically (i.e. ‘Discovery’ of the New World, the Second World War and the First Man on the Moon), examples of time periods not to be tampered with.

          • Samantha

            You are right!

          • S Conroy

            I think you’re on to something with your not-to-be tampered with idea below.

    • Michael Bloom

      The moon landing. What time traveler would NOT want to get a picture at the launch. It would be a great temporal-tourism must see!

      • S Conroy

        Yes it would. So I don’t understand why it’s out of bounds. The other 2 dates are probably associated with massacres so I’d assumed it was for ones own safety.

  • S Conroy

    Found this interesting to read and I like the humour in it. I’d have liked a few more clues on the ending though, perhaps a bit more on his wife’s motivation for using the machine. — Originally I thought she went back in time to get away from him, even at the risk of death. But then it seems that he uses it again and it’s probably to find his wife. So the “a lot could happen in 4 years” paragraph is actually a reference to his situation (?).

    Can anyone tell me what was so awful about 1969? Couldn’t be the moon landing…

    • Samantha

      Or even Nixon’s “landing”….

      • S Conroy

        Wrote something too long and deleted.
        Anyway Nixon feels a bit trivial compared to WW II.
        Realised now that 1492 is ambiguous too. Columbas? Not good if you’re an American Indian. Or could be expulsion of the Jews in Europe.

        • Samantha

          I was only kidding…What about WWI? And why ’33-45 only? Yeah, I know that 1492 has far too many interpretations….The Scots, The English, the Moorish, The Spanish and many others…

          • 33-45 FDR’s reign

          • 1969 – also year I got married 🙂

          • Samantha

            Im sure then its a great year!…Hang on…you sound like a ’60s baby in the very good sense!

          • Samantha

            Thanks a lot for that Jeff! I could not understand it! I thought it may have implied the Great Depression but ’29-’32 was left out!

          • 1969 Moon Landing

          • Samantha

            mmmm…. that’s what we thought but I cant understand the bad thing about that….:) Apart from the cost and holes in the ozone layer…..

          • Samantha

            And Manson was “busy”….

          • So was Joan Didion

          • Samantha

            HAHAHA!!! But was not put behind bars for her white album….

          • Some escaped fame. Some did not.

        • Samantha

          not for the Vietnam veterans….

          • Paul A. Freeman

            I feel the author merely chose historical landmark dates that were readily recognisible to most folk.

          • Samantha

            You are right!

          • S Conroy

            I think you’re on to something with your not-to-be tampered with idea below.

    • Michael Bloom

      The moon landing. What time traveler would NOT want to get a picture at the launch. It would be a great temporal-tourism must see!

      • S Conroy

        Yes it would. So I don’t understand why it’s out of bounds. The other 2 dates are probably associated with massacres so I’d assumed it was for ones own safety.

  • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

    A little wordy for a classified.

  • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

    A little wordy for a classified.

  • joanna b.

    I enjoyed this story immensely.

    it is true that the MC’s motivation for tracking down his wife is unclear. there’s even a suggestion that in the four years of her absence he not only lost his brother but fell in love with another woman. which makes his choice of the past rather than the future really puzzling.

    it does seem pretty clear that his wife did not leave him her assets. perhaps he does not have the wherewithall to live without them. perhaps he’s following her for revenge purposes.

    i wish all that had been clarified, but as Sarah C. A. stated, the ad is already a bit over-wordy. perhaps another story on this should be forthcoming from Kelsey Snyder?

    Four stars from me because this was a good read.

    • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

      Kathy said it first. I commented and then read everybody else’s comments afterwards…

  • joanna b.

    I enjoyed this story immensely.

    it is true that the MC’s motivation for tracking down his wife is unclear. there’s even a suggestion that in the four years of her absence he not only lost his brother but fell in love with another woman. which makes his choice of the past rather than the future really puzzling.

    it does seem pretty clear that his wife did not leave him her assets. perhaps he does not have the wherewithall to live without them. perhaps he’s following her for revenge purposes.

    i wish all that had been clarified, but as Sarah C. A. stated, the ad is already a bit over-wordy. perhaps another story on this should be forthcoming from Kelsey Snyder?

    Four stars from me because this was a good read.

    • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

      Kathy said it first. I commented and then read everybody else’s comments afterwards…

  • Me thinks you digress too often, imagined 1969 for the Vietnam war and the Hippy thing, and came away with the burning question – why, in this warp of a tale, are the machines not allowed to travel into the future? ETTA certainly is missing out.
    Like the way the possibles reflected a “real” back history.
    Over all, sketchy.

    • Samantha

      Appart from the English Table Tennis Association, what on earth is ETTA?

      • Earth Temporal Travel Administration

        • Samantha

          And they have records of arrivals back in time….hmmmmmmmmmmmm

          🙂 IATA

          • Well, who you gonna call?

          • Samantha

            hahaha!!! You of course! I cant hear you….

          • Just let me know when you want to go…

          • Samantha

            Im good and ready….

          • 1969?

          • Samantha

            What Charlie Manson or the White Album?

          • Naw, the whole thing. Back when good was good and bad was groovy.
            But I digress.
            Got to get back to it. Nice bouncing with you.

  • Me thinks you digress too often, imagined 1969 for the Vietnam war and the Hippy thing, and came away with the burning question – why, in this warp of a tale, are the machines not allowed to travel into the future? ETTA certainly is missing out.
    Like the way the possibles reflected a “real” back history.

    Over all, sketchy.

    • Samantha

      Appart from the English Table Tennis Association, what on earth is ETTA?

      • Earth Temporal Travel Administration

        • Samantha

          And they have records of arrivals back in time….hmmmmmmmmmmmm

          🙂 IATA

          • Well, who you gonna call?

          • Samantha

            hahaha!!! You of course! I cant hear you….

          • Just let me know when you want to go…

          • Samantha

            Im good and ready….

          • 1969?

          • Samantha

            What Charlie Manson or the White Album?

          • Naw, the whole thing. Back when good was good and bad was groovy.
            But I digress.
            Got to get back to it. Nice bouncing with you.

  • I like the idea of a story rolled into an ad. As others have stated as well, this one is a little wordy. I got tripped up a little in the middle with the digressions in the ad content.

  • I like the idea of a story rolled into an ad. As others have stated as well, this one is a little wordy. I got tripped up a little in the middle with the digressions in the ad content.

  • Tina Wayland

    I don’t normally like sci-fi, but I read this to the end and enjoyed it. Some places could use tightening up, some details were only for the readers’ benefit (explaining time travel) and could have been more naturally worded, and the ending is just unclear enough to leave us wondering too much, but I loved the structure, the fun story and the originality of the piece. Kudos!

  • Tina Wayland

    I don’t normally like sci-fi, but I read this to the end and enjoyed it. Some places could use tightening up, some details were only for the readers’ benefit (explaining time travel) and could have been more naturally worded, and the ending is just unclear enough to leave us wondering too much, but I loved the structure, the fun story and the originality of the piece. Kudos!

  • Angela Goebel

    I enjoyed the humor in the story, and the author’s extensive knowledge and technical word choice on the “Otterheim,” which really added to the piece – creating a wonderful setting and a bit of character. However, I didn’t quite get the plot and, as I read, waiting for a twist, I didn’t understand the twist once it finally did come (as others have commented). Thanks for the brief escape from my reality!

  • Angela Goebel

    I enjoyed the humor in the story, and the author’s extensive knowledge and technical word choice on the “Otterheim,” which really added to the piece – creating a wonderful setting and a bit of character. However, I didn’t quite get the plot and, as I read, waiting for a twist, I didn’t understand the twist once it finally did come (as others have commented). Thanks for the brief escape from my reality!

  • Michael Bloom

    I like the novel approach to story telling; too often are writers using the same boring approach. There is enough ambiguity that it makes the reader wonder and think. Too often I find that people are uncomfortable not fully knowing every little detail. Granted, I want to know what happens to Riley but the point of fiction is not to tell you everything, it is to show you part of something grander.

  • Michael Bloom

    I like the novel approach to story telling; too often are writers using the same boring approach. There is enough ambiguity that it makes the reader wonder and think. Too often I find that people are uncomfortable not fully knowing every little detail. Granted, I want to know what happens to Riley but the point of fiction is not to tell you everything, it is to show you part of something grander.

  • Paul A. Freeman

    It seems fairly clear that the author chose historical landmark dates that were readily recognisible, no matter where you are from geographically (i.e. ‘Discovery’ of the New World, the Second World War and the First Man on the Moon), as examples of time periods not to be tampered with and therefore denied access to time travellers.

    • S Conroy

      I hadn’t thought of the not-to-be tampered with aspect (had assumed it was some kind of security thing). Thanks for that.

  • Paul A. Freeman

    It seems fairly clear that the author chose historical landmark dates that were readily recognisible, no matter where you are from geographically (i.e. ‘Discovery’ of the New World, the Second World War and the First Man on the Moon), as examples of time periods not to be tampered with and therefore denied access to time travellers.

    • S Conroy

      I hadn’t thought of the not-to-be tampered with aspect (had assumed it was some kind of security thing). Thanks for that.

  • MPmcgurty

    That ad would have cost a lot in my paper, and it didn’t really sound like an ad. I think the legal requirements would be more suited to accompany a bill of sale. If you’re going to state legal requirements, I would think there would be a pamphlet the ETTA provides people.

  • MPmcgurty

    That ad would have cost a lot in my paper, and it didn’t really sound like an ad. I think the legal requirements would be more suited to accompany a bill of sale. If you’re going to state legal requirements, I would think there would be a pamphlet the ETTA provides people.

  • Connell Regner

    Perhaps it’s just me, but time periods cannot be off limits if you can interfere with event before them. Timelines might have been a better choice.

  • Connell Regner

    Perhaps it’s just me, but time periods cannot be off limits if you can interfere with event before them. Timelines might have been a better choice.

  • Dustin Adams

    I liked this. It’s a fun and easy read and unfolds as it progresses. I agree I wanted more about the wife and, given that the man seems to have had a lot happen to him, fall in love with another, etc, why did he choose to go back? He’d expected to the entire time, hence the ad. So I’d have liked more inner conflict, or a more solid reason to leave everything behind.

  • I liked this. It’s a fun and easy read and unfolds as it progresses. I agree I wanted more about the wife and, given that the man seems to have had a lot happen to him, fall in love with another, etc, why did he choose to go back? He’d expected to the entire time, hence the ad. So I’d have liked more inner conflict, or a more solid reason to leave everything behind.

  • Carl Steiger

    Wordy for a newspaper classifed ad, but I presume this ad appeared as some 32nd century hypertext with holovid attached, so wordiness may be perfectly normal in context.

    • MPmcgurty

      Good point.

  • Carl Steiger

    Wordy for a newspaper classifed ad, but I presume this ad appeared as some 32nd century hypertext with holovid attached, so wordiness may be perfectly normal in context.

    • MPmcgurty

      Good point.

  • I love the idea of exploring the legal and contractual aspects of time travel. I remember Douglas Adams on the topic of the impact of time travel on grammar. The term future perfect was banned because it turned out it wasn’t #mirrorofeternity

  • I love the idea of exploring the legal and contractual aspects of time travel. I remember Douglas Adams on the topic of the impact of time travel on grammar. The term future perfect was banned because it turned out it wasn’t #mirrorofeternity

  • Having just read the story and the comments: for me, in addition to being the year I graduated high school,1969 means Woodstock. I don’t know why everyone assumed the dates given in the story were to be avoided because they were “bad”… other than 1933-45 being the Holocaust. 1492 and 1969 both had travel to frontiers, but then so did many other years. So… ?

    • S Conroy

      I think that was my false lead. I actually thought WWII. Then my mind was fixed on the Holocaust theme and 1492 was expulsion of Jews from Europe (only occured later that it was also the arrival of Columbas in America) and then I wondered how 1969 fit in.

  • Having just read the story and the comments: for me, in addition to being the year I graduated high school,1969 means Woodstock. I don’t know why everyone assumed the dates given in the story were to be avoided because they were “bad”… other than 1933-45 being the Holocaust. 1492 and 1969 both had travel to frontiers, but then so did many other years. So… ?

    • S Conroy

      I think that was my false lead. I actually thought WWII. Then my mind was fixed on the Holocaust theme and 1492 was expulsion of Jews from Europe (only occured later that it was also the arrival of Columbas in America) and then I wondered how 1969 fit in.

  • Michael Ampersant

    This is really funny…one of the best pieces I read on EDF

  • Michael Ampersant

    This is really funny…one of the best pieces I read on EDF

  • Alex white

    how much? 10GP final offer, i throw in shawn, hes pretty useless but you’ll like him kinda x ~(or i teach you the runescape climbing boots trick, promise)

  • Alex white

    how much? 10GP final offer, i throw in shawn, hes pretty useless but you’ll like him kinda x ~(or i teach you the runescape climbing boots trick, promise)

  • Miley hater

    i wish i could use this to go back and time and kill miley cyrus’s mother

  • Miley hater

    i wish i could use this to go back and time and kill miley cyrus’s mother

  • nermin

    do you have a time machine that works morman

  • nermin

    do you have a time machine that works morman

  • nermin

    do you sell you time machine reasonable price

  • nermin

    do you sell you time machine reasonable price

  • Ivan

    If it’s gone how will I get another time machine ? And if I want to take a camera to take pictures/videos of dinosaurs could I ? And is there a way to make sure I won’t die ?

  • Ivan

    If it’s gone how will I get another time machine ? And if I want to take a camera to take pictures/videos of dinosaurs could I ? And is there a way to make sure I won’t die ?

  • ray

    I’m Raymond I’m intresting about your time machine I would love to jump into the past or future!

  • ray

    I’m Raymond I’m intresting about your time machine I would love to jump into the past or future!

  • Panneer

    i need this machine to change my past.i need ur help

  • Pugal

    I want to time travel in past its possible? You need to help for my life I go to past 5 year’s 2011 help him my email id pugal24081912@gmail.com

  • Pugal

    Time travel is possible? I’m tried for past 5 year’s then recharge for 5 days it is possible?