5 SECONDS • by Deven D Atkinson

One one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand, four one-thousand, five one-thousand.

Realistically, just how much can you do with five seconds?  Take a few breaths. Walk about twelve feet, if you are a man of my height. Pull a remembrance out of the depths of memory. Find the last beer in the fridge.

That morning we’d had a fight and I couldn’t spare five seconds to admit I was wrong, say I was sorry, and say ‘I love you’. I walked the twelve feet across the kitchen and out the garage door instead as if my job at the Save The Future non-profit was more important.

Over the next six months I struggled with the pain as Gretchen’s smiling face would leap into my thoughts. I tried to run from her memory, to wash it all away with cheeseburgers and beer. I succeeded only in putting on enough weight that I could walk just nine feet in five seconds.

One morning my cotton-mouthed brain concluded that the weight gain was a physical manifestation of survivor’s guilt. If I had walked only nine feet that morning at least I would have died with her when the stove’s gas line split wide open and the kitchen exploded. Only then did I realize I didn’t have survivor’s guilt. I had the old fashioned kind. The idiot who hurts the one he loves kind.

I drove my car off the Brae Gorge Bridge. It was five seconds to the bottom at the speed I was going. I’m pretty good with math, and I did the math as I was topping off the gas tank.

Five one-thousand, six one-thousand, seven one-thousand.

I was snatched from the instant of death and given a second chance at life by Save The Future, Inc. It turned out that they were actually an honest-to-goodness temporal police agency. They must have liked my creative problem solving for their non-profit facade.

They had good drugs and psychologists that helped me forget about those five seconds for a time. I learned how to live again. I even lost the weight.

There were tough times. Like when I was waiting for my extraction shunt at the Andersonville civil war prison. The shape of a cloud reminded me of Gretchen and my heart shattered all over again. Tough Union infantrymen crying at Andersonville was actually more common than any of the diaries and memoirs reported.  I just let loose with the emotions, confident in the knowledge that I wasn’t creating a temporal rift.

I had fast become one of the star operatives, the “go-to” guy. I’d saved the timeline dozens of times. After operatives reach a certain level of success and trust, Save The Future lets us devise our own research missions. Operatives are forbidden from devising missions for personal gains or objectives because that is where the worst boondoggles happen.  The operatives get so caught up in the moment they accidentally start a time rift.  My best work involves fixing a few of these. The obvious historical research like JFK’s assassination, Hitler’s gravesite, and where Amelia Earhart landed, were no longer mysteries.  Most of the operatives’ requests were dips into the past for genealogical or esoteric academic research.

I was ready with my request.  Since I only asked for five seconds, they didn’t ask many questions.

There was a serial killer whose M.O. was to randomly blow people to smithereens with homebrewed explosives. My trip’s official plan was to check if the explosion in my kitchen was truly a gas leak accident, or if it had the signature of this killer’s homebrewed bomb.

I didn’t think it was the serial killer. I just wanted those five seconds back.

My meticulous plan called for the shunting of my past self to a Save The Future soundstage mockup of my kitchen complete with a superb character actor with a holo-face playing the role of Gretchen. I would be shunted into his place and drop the baby black box on the counter beside the refrigerator where it would have a clear view. The past me would be shunted back into the garage just as I closed the door between it and the kitchen and was shunted safely to the mission debriefing room. Past me, and the baby black box, would experience the explosion. Past me would continue thinking that he just walked past Gretchen with hateful words still hanging between us. The box would keep recording video, audio, atmospheric pressure, inertia, temperature, air particulates and whatever the hell else it records, for thirty more minutes before it too would be shunted to debriefing, arriving at the same time that I did. Time travel is fun that way. The trustees called it fool proof.

This fool had no intention of following the plan.

I was shunted into the kitchen. “I was wrong.”

The palmed baby black box dropped carelessly onto the counter. “I am so very sorry.”

Our eyes met. I stopped walking. “I love you, Gretchen.”

I hugged her. She hugged back.

I expected them to let me die and I would have been okay with that. They couldn’t shunt only me because of the hug. Gretchen gasped “Jimmy!” when we appeared in debriefing. The baby black box rattled a bit as it settled onto the conference table, it was dusted with soot and sizzled a little.

The director was in his chair sipping iced tea. “Damn, you gave us a scare, Whitcomb! You could have been killed for real, you know.”

I looked at him, defiant.

He shook his head, a stern scowl on his face. “You know the trustees have to approve recruitment.”

He didn’t understand why I’d driven off that bridge in the first place. I eased Gretchen into a chair and got down on one knee to look her in the eye. At some point while I explained what had happened and answered Gretchen’s questions, the director left the room.

Gretchen hugged me. I hugged back.


Deven D Atkinson is a computer programmer living in rural Southern Ohio.


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 average 5 stars • 2 reader(s) rated this

Every Day Fiction

  • Dustin Adams

    Ooh, sci-fi? Time travel? I feel all warm inside.

    I’m a little surprised the director accepted Jimmy’s wife so easily, but upon consideration, she was dead, so the past’s timeline won’t be affected. (Similar to the novel Immortality Inc.)

    I wonder if someone can illuminate this line for me: “He didn’t understand why I’d driven off that bridge in the first place.”

    If Jimmy thinking that the director doesn’t understand he was willing to die? Both times?

    If so, damn is that romantic.

    • MPmcgurty
      I think the bridge reference meant that the director only knew that he'd driven off the bridge, not that he'd driven off the bridge in grief or guilt over Gretchen's death. So the director thought Gretchen was a new recruit.
  • Ooh, sci-fi? Time travel? I feel all warm inside.

    I’m a little surprised the director accepted Jimmy’s wife so easily, but upon consideration, she was dead, so the past’s timeline won’t be affected. (Similar to the novel Immortality Inc.)

    I wonder if someone can illuminate this line for me: “He didn’t understand why I’d driven off that bridge in the first place.”

    If Jimmy thinking that the director doesn’t understand he was willing to die? Both times?

    If so, damn is that romantic.

    • MPmcgurty
      I think the bridge reference meant that the director only knew that he'd driven off the bridge, not that he'd driven off the bridge in grief or guilt over Gretchen's death. So the director thought Gretchen was a new recruit.
  • I drove my car off the Brae Gorge Bridge. It was five seconds to the bottom at the speed I was going. I’m pretty good with math, and I did the math as I was topping off the gas tank.”

    Horizontal velocity has no effect on vertical drop time, 🙁

    • It does if there is any inclination or declination from the bridge to the water surface. i.e. The incline driving the car up into the air before gravity takes over completely or forcing the car to a speed greater than terminal velocity if the bridge was declined.
      • And the MC figured this all out at the gas pump? Right.
        • He is good with the math. Like 'Wesley Crusher' on Star Trek. Doing his calculus on the fly and all. Just as plausible as advanced synchronic time travel.
          • Well, if Bo and Luke could jump the General Lee so successfully, who am I to criticize :)
  • I drove my car off the Brae Gorge Bridge. It was five seconds to the bottom at the speed I was going. I’m pretty good with math, and I did the math as I was topping off the gas tank.”

    Horizontal velocity has no effect on vertical drop time, 🙁

    • It does if there is any inclination or declination from the bridge to the water surface. i.e. The incline driving the car up into the air before gravity takes over completely or forcing the car to a speed greater than terminal velocity if the bridge was declined.
      • And the MC figured this all out at the gas pump? Right.
        • He is good with the math. Like 'Wesley Crusher' on Star Trek. Doing his calculus on the fly and all. Just as plausible as advanced synchronic time travel.
          • Well, if Bo and Luke could jump the General Lee so successfully, who am I to criticize :)
  • With sci-fi, I think it best if you come out with guns blazing from the very first word. I understand the time thing and how important it is to your story but to set it up front is not you’re best foot foward.

    Save The Future’s image is confusing. What is it, the non-profit, the Inc., or just the Future?

    There has got to be another word for shunted, me thinks you went to the well too many times.

    The love interest is hot.

    Read this two and a half times before I got it right. I suppose in a time rift- somewhere- that would be five seconds.

  • With sci-fi, I think it best if you come out with guns blazing from the very first word. I understand the time thing and how important it is to your story but to set it up front is not you’re best foot foward.

    Save The Future’s image is confusing. What is it, the non-profit, the Inc., or just the Future?

    There has got to be another word for shunted, me thinks you went to the well too many times.

    The love interest is hot.

    Read this two and a half times before I got it right. I suppose in a time rift- somewhere- that would be five seconds.

  • I love the sci-fi. Nice story.

    I agree with a previous commenter with the overuse of the word ‘shunt.’

    The time frame for weight gain, imprisonment, and weight loss seems a little wonky. But, I let it slide as I read it. If you were to make another pass at the story I would recommend tightening that up a bit with clarity on the actual time throughout or drop the six months mentioned in the beginning.

    Thanks for the story.

  • I love the sci-fi. Nice story.

    I agree with a previous commenter with the overuse of the word ‘shunt.’

    The time frame for weight gain, imprisonment, and weight loss seems a little wonky. But, I let it slide as I read it. If you were to make another pass at the story I would recommend tightening that up a bit with clarity on the actual time throughout or drop the six months mentioned in the beginning.

    Thanks for the story.

  • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

    I loved how slyly you led us into the sci-fi here. Really clever. This wasn’t a voice that particularly appealed to me, but the story made me like it. Five stars.

  • Sarah Crysl Akhtar

    I loved how slyly you led us into the sci-fi here. Really clever. This wasn’t a voice that particularly appealed to me, but the story made me like it. Five stars.

  • MPmcgurty

    I’m sure I missed something in this tale. Great idea, but I honestly spent more time on the paragraph describing the “meticulous plan” than the rest of the story.

    First, I stumbled when I read the 6th paragraph, “I drove my car off the…bridge”. If Save the Future rescues him at that moment, how is it that he’s already working for Save the Future the morning Gretchen dies? Didn’t he drive off the bridge in grief or survivor’s guilt? If someone could help me there, I’d appreciate it.

    Back to the “meticulous plot”. Although I love sci-fi, maybe I don’t understand time travel well enough. A “soundstage mockup of my kitchen complete with a superb character actor with a holo-face playing the role of Gretchen. I would be shunted into his place…” This makes no sense to me, and the rest of the paragraph seemed almost as if the author figured if it made sense to him, it should make sense to everyone. I think explanations like this need a little more lay language. Maybe it’s a word count constraint, I don’t know.

    With those two exceptions, I enjoyed the main story and writing quite a bit.

    • I took the "soundstage mockup ..." to be part of the transport/transference process in time travel. As if the process doesn't happen all at once in a flash - you might have a transparency or hologram effect until you were there fully.
      • MPmcgurty
        I should probably let it die here, because I can't quite express what I didn't get about it. So was he saying that the mockup only had an actor playing Gretchen and neither he nor his past self was in the mockup? But when he says "I would be shunted into his place", to whom is he referring and when? This is my last question because I just gave myself a headache.
        • I reread that para again. I does seem a little vague what is going on there. But I think that the author is referring to his past self. Maybe he is unable to occupy the same time and place with garage-Jimmy and the time-traveler-Jimmy. Edit: Maybe the author can clear it up for us.
        • Joseph Kaufman
          After he is saved from driving off the bridge he becomes what I call a "time agent", and time travel is accomplished by "shunting" into other forms (including his own). He was working for StF back in the kitchen because his future self had gone back in time to that moment, just like he had also traveled to the Civil War era and other historical periods. I took the soundstage to be the setup in the future that mirrored what the kitchen looked like. It was like a live rehearsal area so that he knew where to stand -- where the shunt process would map him to back in the past. They mock up the whole area so that they can accurately envision where everyone is down to split-second timing: where his past self would be, where to put the box, where Gretchen would be, etc. The soundstage also serves as the place where his past self would be, unknowingly swapping temporal places with his future self (got to put the other self somewhere, I guess).
          • You said it better than I did. That is what I was trying to get at with the soundstage.
        • S Conroy
          I've just realise after asking pretty much the same question and reading Joseph's answers that the 'his' in the sentence is slightly confusing. It refers to his past self and not to the actor playing Gretchen. Empathise with that headache :-).
  • MPmcgurty

    I’m sure I missed something in this tale. Great idea, but I honestly spent more time on the paragraph describing the “meticulous plan” than the rest of the story.

    First, I stumbled when I read the 6th paragraph, “I drove my car off the…bridge”. If Save the Future rescues him at that moment, how is it that he’s already working for Save the Future the morning Gretchen dies? Didn’t he drive off the bridge in grief or survivor’s guilt? If someone could help me there, I’d appreciate it.

    Back to the “meticulous plot”. Although I love sci-fi, maybe I don’t understand time travel well enough. A “soundstage mockup of my kitchen complete with a superb character actor with a holo-face playing the role of Gretchen. I would be shunted into his place…” This makes no sense to me, and the rest of the paragraph seemed almost as if the author figured if it made sense to him, it should make sense to everyone. I think explanations like this need a little more lay language. Maybe it’s a word count constraint, I don’t know.

    With those two exceptions, I enjoyed the main story and writing quite a bit.

    • I took the "soundstage mockup ..." to be part of the transport/transference process in time travel. As if the process doesn't happen all at once in a flash - you might have a transparency or hologram effect until you were there fully.
      • MPmcgurty
        I should probably let it die here, because I can't quite express what I didn't get about it. So was he saying that the mockup only had an actor playing Gretchen and neither he nor his past self was in the mockup? But when he says "I would be shunted into his place", to whom is he referring and when? This is my last question because I just gave myself a headache.
        • I reread that para again. I does seem a little vague what is going on there. But I think that the author is referring to his past self. Maybe he is unable to occupy the same time and place with garage-Jimmy and the time-traveler-Jimmy. Edit: Maybe the author can clear it up for us.
        • Joseph Kaufman
          After he is saved from driving off the bridge he becomes what I call a "time agent", and time travel is accomplished by "shunting" into other forms (including his own). He was working for StF back in the kitchen because his future self had gone back in time to that moment, just like he had also traveled to the Civil War era and other historical periods. I took the soundstage to be the setup in the future that mirrored what the kitchen looked like. It was like a live rehearsal area so that he knew where to stand -- where the shunt process would map him to back in the past. They mock up the whole area so that they can accurately envision where everyone is down to split-second timing: where his past self would be, where to put the box, where Gretchen would be, etc. The soundstage also serves as the place where his past self would be, unknowingly swapping temporal places with his future self (got to put the other self somewhere, I guess).
          • You said it better than I did. That is what I was trying to get at with the soundstage.
        • S Conroy
          I've just realise after asking pretty much the same question and reading Joseph's answers that the 'his' in the sentence is slightly confusing. It refers to his past self and not to the actor playing Gretchen. Empathise with that headache :-).
  • Carl Steiger

    I’m quite impressed with the “meticulous plan” to avoid monkeying with the experiences of the past self. I was momentarily confused by Save the Future in the same way MPmcgurty was, but I soon enough figured it out.

    • MPmcgurty
      Please explain it to me then. How could he be working for them both times?
      • Carl Steiger
        He's already working for their front organization, the "non-profit," then gets rescued by their true temporal police arm.
        • MPmcgurty
          Thank you! 6th paragraph is fine now. ;)
    • S Conroy
      Can you help me too please, Carl? Or anyone else? He is shunted into the role of the character actor playing the role of Gretchen. How does it work then that he as some kind of embodiment of Gretchen tells the real Gretchen that he loves her (and holds her tight so they both get brought into the future)? Am I missing something obvious?
      • Joseph Kaufman
        He is shunted (i.e. exchanged) with his past self, not with Gretchen. His past self goes to the mockup where a hologram plays Gretchen. So, the future guy goes back and grabs the real past Gretchen, then comes back to the future with her (while his past self is taken back to the garage, right where he was when the blast went off).
        • S Conroy
          Thank you very much. This seems to work...
  • Carl Steiger

    I’m quite impressed with the “meticulous plan” to avoid monkeying with the experiences of the past self. I was momentarily confused by Save the Future in the same way MPmcgurty was, but I soon enough figured it out.

    • MPmcgurty
      Please explain it to me then. How could he be working for them both times?
      • Carl Steiger
        He's already working for their front organization, the "non-profit," then gets rescued by their true temporal police arm.
        • MPmcgurty
          Thank you! 6th paragraph is fine now. ;)
    • S Conroy
      Can you help me too please? Or anyone else? He is shunted into the role of the character actor playing the role of Gretchen. How does it work then that he as some kind of embodiment of Gretchen tells the real Gretchen that he loves her (and holds her tight so they both get brought into the future)? Am I missing something obvious?
      • Joseph Kaufman
        He is shunted (i.e. exchanged) with his past self, not with Gretchen. His past self goes to the mockup where a hologram plays Gretchen. So, the future guy goes back and grabs the real past Gretchen, then comes back to the future with her (while his past self is taken back to the garage, right where he was when the blast went off).
        • S Conroy
          Thank you very much. This seems to work... (And it solves the now superfluous question which my past self had about why a male actor would be playing the role of Gretchen.)
  • S Conroy

    Enjoyed this and liked the voice. Was a bit confused about the mechanics of the meticulous plan, but perhaps someone will enlighten me.

    • Joseph Kaufman
      If you read my replies above, perhaps that will aid with any confusion. (And it is just my interpretation -- I can be sure it's 100% right!)
  • S Conroy

    Enjoyed this and liked the voice. Was a bit confused about the mechanics of the meticulous plan, but perhaps someone will enlighten me.

    • Joseph Kaufman
      If you read my replies above, perhaps that will aid with any confusion. (And it is just my interpretation -- I can be sure it's 100% right!)
  • Genghis Bob

    There’s nothing not to like in this story. There’s enough ambiguity in the conclusion to allow me to think that the company knew all along what his plan was, and they were happy to help their star employee save his wife. It makes me happy to think this.

    A few technical issues:

    1) I got a little confused when the plan “called for the shunting of my past self to a Save The Future soundstage mockup of my kitchen complete with a superb character actor with a holo-face playing the role of Gretchen. I would be shunted into his place . . . ”

    . . . at first, I thought that the MC would be shunted into the character actor’s place, not his future self’s; this caused cognitive dissonance, and I had to sit down for a while.

    2) Then I had to stay sitting for the meticulous description of the meticulous plan. Really slowed me down for a bit, working that one out.

    3) An explosion? Really? That’s a little over-the-top.

    But then, so is Time Travel, so what the hey, I’ll go with it. Especially since I can’t think of a similar peril that takes a few seconds to kick off, and that could kill both of them in one go.

    Anyway, Time Travel stories are supposed to be confusing, and a little extravagant – that’s the fun of ’em. And this one was fun.

  • Genghis Bob

    There’s nothing not to like in this story. There’s enough ambiguity in the conclusion to allow me to think that the company knew all along what his plan was, and they were happy to help their star employee save his wife. It makes me happy to think this.

    A few technical issues:

    1) I got a little confused when the plan “called for the shunting of my past self to a Save The Future soundstage mockup of my kitchen complete with a superb character actor with a holo-face playing the role of Gretchen. I would be shunted into his place . . . ”

    . . . at first, I thought that the MC would be shunted into the character actor’s place, not his future self’s; this caused cognitive dissonance, and I had to sit down for a while.

    2) Then I had to stay sitting for the meticulous description of the meticulous plan. Really slowed me down for a bit, working that one out.

    3) An explosion? Really? That’s a little over-the-top.

    But then, so is Time Travel, so what the hey, I’ll go with it. Especially since I can’t think of a similar peril that takes a few seconds to kick off, and that could kill both of them in one go.

    Anyway, Time Travel stories are supposed to be confusing, and a little extravagant – that’s the fun of ’em. And this one was fun.

  • Paul A. Freeman

    The story felt a bit contrived in places, but was engaging.

  • Paul A. Freeman

    The story felt a bit contrived in places, but was engaging.

  • joanna b.

    It was very difficult for me to understand this story despite reading it 3x as well as backing-and-forthing within it each time.

    i saw that others were confused too. the explanations from Joseph and Ward and Carl were helpful but they had to be quite detailed to get their point across.

    all of which led me to believe that this could have been a good-to-great science fiction story had it not also attempted to be flash fiction. for me, it didn’t fit the flash model.

    the author, in my mind, does not suffer from a lack of imagination. au contraire. this story is filled with ideas, places, people, relationships. but it reads like it’s an early draft done while the mind is racing forward with the story but the fingers on the keyboard are not fast enough to keep up.

    the story needed more expository information about the process of time travel. the comments make that quite clear as well as my own experience with that aspect of the story.

    there were many contradictions about MC’s knowledge about his place of business. he says in Paragraph 1, for example, that he knows Save the Future is a non-profit, then somehow he doesn’t know its real purpose when he’s being very creative working for their for-profit facade at that same time, then he kind of suddenly has a position as a time traveler for them, and i’m getting an Exedrin headache from trying to figure this out.

    i also had trouble with Paragraph 5 which wasn’t even about the time travel. Exactly how did the MC suddenly discover that he did not have survivor guilt, he had old-fashioned guilt? Especially as he did so in a paragraph with an opening sentence saying that he concluded that he did have survivor guilt.

    why did he then immediately decide to commit suicide?

    the ideas were terrific and, in this case, a longer story would have made for an easier and probably quicker read.

    3 stars.

    • Have to say, the curiosity and intelligence of the commentors on this site light up both sides of the fence to any given story. Time travel in fiction is not really my thing, and I defend myself with preferences. Star Trek was all about Kirk and lasers not time warp algorithms. Whatever the author wanted us to understand is understandable as long as it fits in flash (or any story) like it is suppose to. This is Sci-Fy fiction after all. I do not see the neccessity to go to the encylopedia of- the world according to trekkies- to maintain entertainment.
  • joanna b.

    It was very difficult for me to understand this story despite reading it 3x as well as backing-and-forthing within it each time.

    i saw that others were confused too. the explanations from Joseph and Ward and Carl were helpful but they had to be quite detailed to get their point across.

    all of which led me to believe that this could have been a good-to-great science fiction story had it not also attempted to be flash fiction. for me, it didn’t fit the flash model.

    the author, in my mind, does not suffer from a lack of imagination. au contraire. this story is filled with ideas, places, people, relationships. but it reads like it’s an early draft done while the mind is racing forward with the story but the fingers on the keyboard are not fast enough to keep up.

    the story needed more expository information about the process of time travel. the comments make that quite clear as well as my own experience with that aspect of the story.

    there were many contradictions about MC’s knowledge about his place of business. he says in Paragraph 1, for example, that he knows Save the Future is a non-profit, then somehow he doesn’t know its real purpose when he’s being very creative working for their for-profit facade at that same time, then he kind of suddenly has a position as a time traveler for them, and i’m getting an Exedrin headache from trying to figure this out.

    i also had trouble with Paragraph 5 which wasn’t even about the time travel. Exactly how did the MC suddenly discover that he did not have survivor guilt, he had old-fashioned guilt? Especially as he did so in a paragraph with an opening sentence saying that he concluded that he did have survivor guilt.

    why did he then immediately decide to commit suicide?

    the ideas were terrific and, in this case, a longer story would have made for an easier and probably quicker read.

    3 stars.

    • Have to say, the curiosity and intelligence of the commentors on this site light up both sides of the fence to any given story. Time travel in fiction is not really my thing, and I defend myself with preferences. Star Trek was all about Kirk and lasers not time warp algorithms. Whatever the author wanted us to understand is understandable as long as it fits in flash (or any story) like it is suppose to. This is Sci-Fy fiction after all. I do not see the neccessity to go to the encylopedia of- the world according to trekkies- to be entertainment. May the force be with you.
  • Lucinda Kempe

    Enjoyed it. A G. Sauderean feel and play with the language.

  • Lucinda Kempe

    Enjoyed it. A G. Sauderean feel and play with the language.

  • Connell Regner

    Now if you were playing to a strictly sci-fi audience
    understanding would have been greatly enhanced, but I guess that’s the fun of
    having an audience that’s into different genres. I quite liked the story and if
    it’s a particular genre I like I can suspend believe and go with the flow etc.
    I’m also a fan of ambiguity as it gives me the chance to use my brain. Thanks

  • Connell Regner

    Now if you were playing to a strictly sci-fi audience
    understanding would have been greatly enhanced, but I guess that’s the fun of
    having an audience that’s into different genres. I quite liked the story and if
    it’s a particular genre I like I can suspend believe and go with the flow etc.
    I’m also a fan of ambiguity as it gives me the chance to use my brain. Thanks

  • Angela Goebel

    I liked this. The many ways time can be used and abused and taken for granted pulled me into this story. I also enjoyed the shift from a more realistic setting to a futuristic setting, mixing two genres to allow the main character to play with time. Very cool, stylistically!

  • Angela Goebel

    I liked this. The many ways time can be used and abused and taken for granted pulled me into this story. I also enjoyed the shift from a more realistic setting to a futuristic setting, mixing two genres to allow the main character to play with time. Very cool, stylistically!

  • A lovely time paradox. I enjoyed reading this.

  • A lovely time paradox. I enjoyed reading this.